High Tide in Tucson | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of High Tide in Tucson.
This section contains 6,007 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Interview by Barbara Kingsolver with Robin Epstein

SOURCE: “Barbara Kingsolver,” in The Progressive, Vol. 60, No. 2, February, 1996, pp. 33-7.

In the following interview, originally conducted in December of 1995, Kingsolver discusses High Tide in Tucson, her literary and social preoccupations, and critical reception.

In a chapter in her new book of wide-ranging essays, High Tide in Tucson, Barbara Kingsolver describes a trip to Phoenix's Heard Museum with her daughter, Camille, who was five years old at the time. One of her hopes for the visit, she writes, is that Camille will shed the notion that Native Americans are “people that lived a long time ago,” an idea she picked up from the dominant culture even though it contradicted her own experience with Tohono O'odham and Yaqui playmates. Thanks to the museum's mission of appreciation for modern Native American life as well as history, Camille gleans some understanding of Native American reality outside spaghetti westerns. Indians, she tells...

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This section contains 6,007 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Interview by Barbara Kingsolver with Robin Epstein
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Interview by Barbara Kingsolver with Robin Epstein from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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