The Book of Evidence | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of The Book of Evidence.
This section contains 1,133 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Erica Abeel

SOURCE: "He Killed Her Because He Could," in New York Times Book Review, April 15, 1990, p. 11.

In the following review, Abeel asserts that in The Book of Evidence "Mr. Banville has gambled that he could write a mesmerizing tale about a monster—and he has won."

Here is an astonishing, disturbing little novel [The Book of Evidence] that might have been coughed up from hell. A first-person narrator confesses to a murder. It's soon apparent, though, that the crime was not inspired by greed, revenge or any other discernible motive. The narrator is a sort of accidental killer—Everyman as monster.

Freddie Montgomery, a gifted scientist, presents his confession as he sits in jail awaiting trial. He imagines his ruminations as a courtroom statement and posits his readers as judge and jury. John Banville, the author of Doctor Copernicus, Kepler and other novels, has made his Freddie a thoroughly...

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This section contains 1,133 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Erica Abeel
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Critical Review by Erica Abeel from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.