Aurora Leigh | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 22 pages of analysis & critique of Aurora Leigh.
This section contains 6,474 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi

SOURCE: "Aurora Leigh: The Vocation of the Woman Poet," in Victorian Poetry, Vol. 19, No. 1, Spring, 1981, pp. 35-48.

In the essay that follows, Gelpi sees Aurora Leigh as a metaphorical investigation of Browning's changing attitudes toward herself her profession, and womanhood in general

In recent years Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Aurora Leigh has reemerged, after more than half a century of neglect, as a strikingly important Victorian poem, historically significant in its interaction with the works of other Victorian writers and immediately relevant in its depiction of a feminist consciousness. Cora Kaplan's essay on the poem uses the earlier insights of Ellen Moers and Patricia Thomson to bring both these aspects of the poem together.1 She demonstrates that the plot of Aurora Leigh, far from being a pastiche of those scenes and characters from other writers which had caught Barrett Browning's fancy, is in fact "an overlapping sequence of dialogues...

(read more)

This section contains 6,474 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook