Aurora Leigh | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of Aurora Leigh.
This section contains 4,923 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kathleen K. Hickok

SOURCE: "New Yet Orthodox: Female Characters in Aurora Leigh," in International Journal of Women's Studies, Vol. 3, No. 5, September/October, 1980, pp. 479-89.

In the following essay, Hickok explores Browning's feminist inversion of conventional literary and social norms in Aurora Leigh.

I

Interest in Aurora Leigh, by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, has revived during the last few years, chiefly because of the feminist perspective from which this remarkable "verse novel" examines nineteenth-century England. In turn, renewed interest in Aurora Leigh has led to re-evaluation of Barrett Browning's1 other poems, especially those depicting female figures, a process rewarded with rediscoveries of numerous of her poems long ago allowed to disappear from the literary canon of Victorian poetry.2 We must not forget, however, that just as Aurora Leigh exists in the context of Barrett Browning's other poetry, her other poetry itself exists in the context of the nineteenth-century feminine poetic tradition in England...

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This section contains 4,923 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kathleen K. Hickok
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Critical Essay by Kathleen K. Hickok from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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