Cat's Eye | Critical Essay by Nathalie Cooke

This literature criticism consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis & critique of Cat's Eye.
This section contains 2,667 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Nathalie Cooke

SOURCE: "Reading Reflections: The Autobiographical Illusion in Cat's Eye," in Essays on Life Writing: From Genre to Critical Practice, edited by Marlene Kadar, University of Toronto Press, 1992, pp. 162-70.

In the following essay, Cooke explores Atwood's use of a fictional protagonist and an autobiographical form in Cat's Eye.

I have been told by friends, relatives, colleagues, and teachers—in fact, by everyone I know who has read it—that Margaret Atwood's Cat's Eye is 'more autobiographical than her other books.' And, of course, they are right. It is more autobiographical—or, anyway, it is more obviously about self-representation—than her other books. But it is autobiographical in the same way that Lady Oracle is gothic: it speaks to the form as much as it speaks from or within it.

The fascinating part about all this is that those experienced readers...

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This section contains 2,667 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Nathalie Cooke
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Critical Essay by Nathalie Cooke from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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