Margaret Atwood | Critical Essay by Valerie Trueblood

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Margaret Atwood.
This section contains 1,161 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Patricia Morley

Critical Essay by Valerie Trueblood

It is the life-impulse [Atwood] uncovers and venerates [in Surfacing] alone on the island peeling off her civilized skins. This is the impulse [she] uncovers in her poetry, honoring the claim-to-life of whatever lives.

The narrator of Surfacing sees a heron killed for sport hanging in a tree and is as powerfully converted as Saint Eustace coming upon the stag with the cross between its antlers…. Her magnified understanding is not occupied with what the heron might stand for, or mean to humans, but with the mutilated bird itself, the violation of its life. Atwood's birds and beasts aren't symbols. She hails in each thing its own life, and its own physique: for her these are enough to express its sacredness. (p. 19)

A new poetry of love and death has been taking shape since the outrush of feminist energy...

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This section contains 1,161 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Patricia Morley
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