As You Like It | Frederick Turner

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of As You Like It.
This section contains 6,157 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
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Frederick Turner

SOURCE: "As You Like It: 'Subjective', Objective', and 'Natural' Time," in Shakespeare and the Nature of Time: Moral and Philosophical Themes in Some Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare, Oxford at the Clarendon Press, 1971, pp. 28-44.

In the essay below, Turner describes the attitudes of Jaques, Touchstone, and Rosalind and Orlando toward timehistorical, natural, and personal, respectivelyand asserts that all three viewpoints are reconciled through marriage at the end of the play.

As You Like It opens with two characters who, in terms of the hierarchy of social power, are weak and inferior: Orlando, the younger brother, and Adam, the old man. One is denied his place in society; the other is past his usefulness. Orlando tellingly distinguishes between the 'gentle condition of blood' and the 'courtesy of nations';1 between what is owed him as a member of society, and what is...

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This section contains 6,157 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Frederick Turner