Romeo and Juliet | Literature Criticism 'And All Things Change Them to the Contrary': Romeo and Juliet and the Metaphysics of Language

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of Romeo and Juliet.
This section contains 5,556 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
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David Lucking, Università degli Studi di Lecce, Italy

While the fact that oxymoron is the most pervasive rhetorical figure in Romeo and Juliet is unlikely to escape the notice of any reasonably attentive reader, the significance that is to be attributed to this predominance is by no means equally apparent. Critics have evinced widely varying views as to whether the frequency with which this device recurs is to be regarded as a key to character or to the stage of development attained by Shakespeare's own art at the time of composition, and whether in either case its use is indicative of control of the verbal medium or of domination by it. It has been suggested on the one hand that the predilection for this and other figures is symptomatic of an...

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This section contains 5,556 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the 'And All Things Change Them to the Contrary': Romeo and Juliet and the Metaphysics of Language