Archie Randolph Ammons | Critical Essay by Stephen Yenser

This literature criticism consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis & critique of Archie Randolph Ammons.
This section contains 838 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Charles Fishman

Critical Essay by Stephen Yenser

Although they shade off into one another, there are basically three kinds of poem in [A. R. Ammons's The Selected Poems: 1951–1977], and they all have to do with nature. First there is the quasi-imagist poem that usually describes a scene or develops a single metaphor while doing so ("Rectitude," "Right On," and "Winter Scene," for example). These poems are the slightest, on the whole, but usually charming. Then there is a parable, distinguished from the preceding by the prominence of the moral and, often, by a dialogue between the poet and his favorite solitary, the wind, or some crusty gulch or sage old mountain ("The Wide Land," "Terminus," "Dunes"). In this mode Ammons can be as winsome as Cummings and as pithy as Frost. The wonder is that he can be both at once. The meditation on nature differs...

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This section contains 838 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Charles Fishman
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