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Critical Essay | William L. Andrews

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of William L. Andrews.
This section contains 6,880 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
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William L. Andrews

SOURCE: "Richard Wright and the African American Autobiography Tradition," in Style, Vol. 27, No. 2, Summer, 1993, pp. 271-84.

In the following essay, Andrews identifies Richard Wright's Black Boy (American Hunger) as a defining work in the tradition of African American autobiography.

To tell the whole truth in the name of complete honesty or to conceal part of the truth out of deference to white readers' sensibilities—this dilemma and the anxiety it spawned have haunted African-American autobiography since its beginnings. The earliest black American autobiographers frequently commented on their unique dilemma: speak forthrightly and be thought a liar or censor oneself in the hope of being believed. Antebellum slave narrators introduced what Robert Stepto has called "distrust of the reader" into African-American autobiographical discourse by admitting, in the classic formulation of Harriet Jacobs, "I have not exaggerated the...

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This section contains 6,880 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our William L. Andrews - William L. Andrews
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