All's Well That Ends Well | Critical Essay by Marilyn L. Williamson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of All's Well That Ends Well.
This section contains 7,173 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Marilyn L. Williamson

Critical Essay by Marilyn L. Williamson

SOURCE: "The Problem Plays: Social Regulation of Desire," in The Patriarchy of Shakespeare's Comedies, Wayne State University Press, 1986, pp. 55-110.

In the following excerpt, Williamson explores All's Well that Ends Well in light of the social and legal conventions used to control desire in the younger generations of the seventeenth century.

In 1603 Shakespeare's most important audience changed with the death of the old queen and the accession of James I. By May 1603 Shakespeare's company, The Chamberlain's Men, became The King's Servants and Grooms of the Chamber. In 1604-5, the year of Measure for Measure, the company performed eleven times at court, and seven of the plays they presented, including Measure, were Shakespeare's.1 Representations of the patriarchal ruler were natural subjects to interest the new king, who came to the throne with a theory of kingship about which he...

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This section contains 7,173 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Marilyn L. Williamson