All's Well That Ends Well | Critical Essay by Carol Thomas Neely

This literature criticism consists of approximately 31 pages of analysis & critique of All's Well That Ends Well.
This section contains 9,142 words
(approx. 31 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Carol Thomas Neely

SOURCE: "Power and Virginity in the Problem Comedies: All's Well That Ends Well," in Broken Nuptials in Shakespeare's Plays, Yale University Press, 1985, pp. 58-104.

In the following excerpt, Neely argues that as a "problem play, " an often corrupt sexuality, rather than romantic love, drives action and informs imagery, language, character, and plot of All's Well That Ends Well.

In the problem plays, . . . there are no male disguises for the heroines, no green worlds, no fairies, no parody couples to express desire and protect the main couples; even the bawdy is changed in tone. Sexuality is now frequently dissociated from marriage and procreation. It finds expression in seduction (Troilus and Cressida and All's Well), aggressive lust (Measure for Measure), prostitution (Measure for Measure, Othello), promiscuity (Troilus and Cressida), and, perhaps, adultery (Hamlet). Instead of being connected with imagery of growth and fertility, sexuality is associated...

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This section contains 9,142 words
(approx. 31 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Carol Thomas Neely
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Carol Thomas Neely from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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