All's Well That Ends Well | Literature Criticism Sheldon P. Zitner

This literature criticism consists of approximately 14 pages of analysis & critique of All's Well That Ends Well.
This section contains 4,137 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
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Sheldon P. Zitner

SOURCE: "Power and Status," in Harvester New Critical Introductions to Shakespeare: All's Well That Ends Well, Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1989, pp. 40-86.

In the following excerpt, Zitner examines the contemporary social conventions that underscore the action of All's Well That Ends Well.

All's Well opens with a social thunderclap which has been muffled by the passage of social history. It is doubtful that historical reconstruction alone will enable a modern audience to feel at once, though it may help us to 'appreciate', the intensity that hovers about the speeches at the very beginning of the first scene of All's Well, a moment in any case subject to neglect because of the audience's yet unfocused attention. The Countess is losing her son, not because in the ordinary course of the life...

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This section contains 4,137 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Sheldon P. Zitner