Isabel Allende | Literature Criticism Critical Review by Jean McNeil

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of Isabel Allende.
This section contains 848 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Jean McNeil

Critical Review by Jean McNeil

SOURCE: "Gringo Inventions," in The Times Literary Supplement, No. 4710, July 9, 1993, p. 22.

In the review below, McNeil contends that Allende's treatment of themes in The Infinite Plan is predictable and simplistic, and that her female characters are stereotypical.

"What they most esteemed was the ability to tell a story", Isabel Allende writes in The Infinite Plan. She is referring, here, to the Vietnamese, but you feel she might also be thinking of her own readership. The Chilean writer has been praised for her narrative talents; her hugely successful novels, The House of the Spirits and Eva Luna, had their grounding in the weaving of separate but interlocking narratives, and their compelling marriage of the opulent and the violent earned her the title "the female García Márquez".

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This section contains 848 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Jean McNeil
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