All's Well That Ends Well | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Susan Snyder

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of All's Well That Ends Well.
This section contains 5,089 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Susan Snyder

Critical Essay by Susan Snyder

SOURCE: Snyder, Susan, ed. Introduction to The Oxford Shakespeare: All's Well That Ends Well, by William Shakespeare, pp. 1-67. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.

In the following essay, Snyder examines the diverse critical assessments of All's Well That Ends Well's Helena from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries.

All's Well that Ends Well has never been a favourite with audiences and readers. No allusions to it from Shakespeare's own time have been found, and evaluations by nineteenth- and early twentieth-century critics tend to be at best defensive; more often their tone is embarrassed or denunciatory, and some, like Quiller-Couch, Tillyard, and Josephine W. Bennett, do not hesitate to label the play a failure. Eighteenth-century audiences enjoyed the Paroles plot, but the Garrick version they saw displaced and dimmed the heroine and her...

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This section contains 5,089 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Susan Snyder