All's Well That Ends Well | Critical Essay by Robert Ornstein

This literature criticism consists of approximately 39 pages of analysis & critique of All's Well That Ends Well.
This section contains 10,474 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Irene G. Dash

Critical Essay by Robert Ornstein

SOURCE: “All's Well That Ends Well,” in Shakespeare's Comedies: From Roman Farce to Romantic Mystery, Associated University Presses, 1986, pp. 173-94.

In the following essay, Ornstein surveys the plot and principal characters of All's Well That Ends Well.

It is not easy to say why Shakespeare wanted to write a play about characters as limited and uninspiring as Helena and Bertram. A relatively straightforward dramatization of Boccaccio's tale of Giletta and Beltramo,1 All's Well is the only comedy that centers on a single love—or rather, a single love-hate—relationship. No Hero, Nerissa, or Celia stands by Helena's side; for most of the play she is a solitary figure who keeps her own counsel and pursues her ends without confiding them to any other person. For a time Bertram has Parolles as a companion, but...

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This section contains 10,474 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Irene G. Dash