Alice's Adventures in Wonderland | Critical Essay by William A. Madden

This literature criticism consists of approximately 25 pages of analysis & critique of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
This section contains 7,373 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: "Framing the Alices," in PMLA, Vol. 101, No. 3, May, 1986, pp. 362-73.

In the following essay, Madden addresses the genesis and function of the three poems that "frame" Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass.

Over the past thirty years Lewis Carroll studies have both altered and generally enhanced the reputation of Carroll's two Alices. Yet from early on in this reevaluation process one feature of these famous stories has posed a persistent critical problem. I refer to the three poems, one prefacing each of the Alice books and the third concluding Looking-Glass, that, together with the prose ending of Wonderland, frame the central tales. The problem is raised in acute form by Peter Coveney in his influential study of the figure of the child in nineteenth-century English literature: praising the central Alice dream tales as triumphs of "astringent and intelligent art," he detects...

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This section contains 7,373 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William A. Madden
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by William A. Madden from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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