Alice's Adventures in Wonderland | Critical Essay by Margaret Boe Birns

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
This section contains 4,268 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Margaret Boe Birns

Critical Essay by Margaret Boe Birns

SOURCE: "Solving the Mad Hatter's Riddle," in The Massachusetts Review, Vol. XXV, No. 3, Autumn, 1984, pp. 457-68.

In the essay below, Birns explores the theme of eating and cannibalism in Alice.

Even a cursory glance at Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland will reveal one of its obsessive themes, namely, eating, or more darkly, cannibalism. Most of the creatures in Wonderland are relentless carnivores, and they eat creatures who, save for some outer physical differences, are very like themselves, united, in fact, by a common "humanity." The very first poem found in the text establishes the motif of eating and being eaten:

How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!
How cheerfully he seems to grin
How neatly spreads his claws,
And welcomes little fishes in,
With...

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This section contains 4,268 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Margaret Boe Birns
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