Louisa May Alcott | Critical Essay by Jean Fagan Yellin

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of Louisa May Alcott.
This section contains 5,437 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jean Fagan Yellin

Critical Essay by Jean Fagan Yellin

SOURCE: "From Success to Experience: Louisa May Alcott's Work," in The Massachusetts Review, Vol. XXI, No. 3, Fall, 1980, pp. 527-39.

In the following essay, Yellin argues that Alcott's feminist concerns are revealed in her novel Work, which is distinguished from other nineteenth-century novels "in proposing that women extend their actions into the public sphere."

From Hawthorne's Zenobia to Chopin's Edna, in nineteenth-century American fiction female characters who stray beyond the domestic sphere end their lives as suicides. This literature was written while feminists were emerging into the public arena demanding economic, social, domestic, and political rights for women. During this period Louisa May Alcott wrote Work, an adult semi-autobiographical novel. Daughter of feminist abolitionist communitarians Abba May and Bronson Alcott, neighbor and friend of Emerson and Thoreau, Alcott lived near the center of many of the radical movements of...

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This section contains 5,437 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jean Fagan Yellin
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