Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? | Literature Criticism Critical Review by Robert Brustein

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?.
This section contains 1,148 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Robert Brustein

Critical Review by Robert Brustein

SOURCE: "Albee and the Medusa Head," in New Republic, Vol. 147, No. 18, November 3, 1962, pp. 29-30.

In the following excerpt of a review of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Brustein recognizes Albee's talent for compelling and clever dialogue and his inventiveness, but also notes what he perceives as the author's failure to create a cohesive drama.

Edward Albee's new work embodies both the failings and the virtues of his previous plays. But its positive achievements are substantial, and I am finally beginning to regard this playwright's future with real expectation. Albee's technical dexterity has always been breathtaking—for sheer theatrical skill, no American, not even Williams, can match him—but like Williams, he has been inclined to falsify his native gifts, distorting experience through self-defensive reflecting mirrors. In Who...

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This section contains 1,148 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Robert Brustein