Edmund Spenser | William Rossky

This literature criticism consists of approximately 37 pages of analysis & critique of Edmund Spenser.
This section contains 10,932 words
(approx. 37 pages at 300 words per page)
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William Rossky

SOURCE: "Imagination in the English Renaissance: Psychology and Poetic," in Studies in the Renaissance, Vol. V, 1989, pp. 49-73.

Below, Rossky discusses the Renaissance notion of the poet's proper use of imagination—that imaginative writing must be based upon accurate perceptions, but that controlled and disciplined artifice can actually aid the poet in reconstructing objective, real events.

Shakespeare couples lunatic, lover, and poet as 'of imagination all compact' (Dream v.i.7-8); Spenser finds that Phantasies' chamber is filled with 'leasings, tales, and lies' (F.Q. II.ix.51.9) and that his eyes seem 'mad or foolish' (F.Q. II.ix.52.7); Drayton speaks of the 'doting trumperie' of imagination;1 when men's minds become 'inflamed', says Bacon, 'it is all done by stimulating the imagination till it becomes ungovernable, and not only sets reason at nought, but offers violence to it'.2 These views of imagination and its activity...

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This section contains 10,932 words
(approx. 37 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the William Rossky
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