Chinua Achebe | Critical Essay by The New Yorker

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Chinua Achebe.
This section contains 136 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by The New Yorker

[The stories in "Girls at War and Other Stories"] show, among other things, how British colonialism, the disintegration of tribal ways, modern education, and the Biafran war have affected Nigerian life. The excellent title story is about a proud young Ibo girl who becomes completely demoralized by the war. In another story, "The Voter," old rituals and new money are used to fix a local election. Mr. Achebe's writing has a kind of serene, grandfatherly quality—especially his humor, which comes at unexpected moments. These are worldly, intelligent, absorbing stories, whose only flaw is a superfluity of untranslated Ibo words and phrases….

A review of "Girls at War and Other Stories," in The New Yorker (© 1973 by The New Yorker Magazine, Inc.), Vol. XLIX, No. 8, April 14, 1973, p. 155.

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This section contains 136 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by The New Yorker
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