Abraham Cahan | Critical Essay by Sanford E. Marovitz

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of Abraham Cahan.
This section contains 6,292 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Sanford E. Marovitz

Critical Essay by Sanford E. Marovitz

SOURCE: "The Lonely New Americans of Abraham Cahan," in American Quarterly, Vol. 20, No. 2, Part 1, Summer, 1968, pp. 196-210.

In the following essay, Marovitz argues that Cahan's characters fail to achieve healthy personal relationships because they abandon their faith for materialism.

William Dean Howells, impressed with a short story which his wife had pointed out to him, called on its author in the bustling ghetto district of New York's Lower East Side. Abraham Cahan was not home, but Howells left his card, and not long afterward his call was returned. The result of this interview in 1895 was Cahan's first novel, Yekl; A Tale of the New York Ghetto, which was published the following year, and which drew from Howells a very favorable review. In 1898 Cahan brought out his second book, The Imported Bridegroom and Other Tales of the New York...

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This section contains 6,292 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Sanford E. Marovitz
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