The Woman in the Dunes | Critical Essay by Earl Miner

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of The Woman in the Dunes.
This section contains 400 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Earl Miner

The story of an unprepossessing schoolteacher captured on an insect-hunting excursion and subjected to slavery would seem merely bizarre if it were not treated in a meaningful way [in The Woman in the Dunes]. Some of Kobo Abé's readers will recall Kafka's manipulation of a nightmarish tyranny of the unknown, others Beckett's selection of sites like the sandpit of this novel as a symbol of the undignified human predicament. Yet others will see that Abé remains wholly Japanese in rendering his abstract theme through particulars observed with such attention that they take on an almost perverse beauty…. [He] has created a myth of suffering humanity within the recognizably real frame of contemporary Japanese society.

He depicts the ease with which man loses civilized values while yet insisting upon a residual humanity. The unhappy schoolteacher...

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This section contains 400 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Earl Miner