A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Joan Burbick

This literature criticism consists of approximately 32 pages of analysis & critique of A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers.
This section contains 9,363 words
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Critical Essay by Joan Burbick

SOURCE: Burbick, Joan. “Henry David Thoreau: The Uncivil Historian.” Bucknell Review 28, no. 1 (1983): 81‐97.

In the following essay, Burbick analyzes Thoreau's views concerning the treatment of history, including his disdain for historical approaches that rely on romantic and novelistic techniques.

By the first half of the nineteenth century, Americans were searching for histories that would justify their actions both at home and abroad. The romantic historians of this period in part satisfied this demand, creating stories that sustained the ideal of progress, the triumph of civilization, and the necessary control of “primitive” forces. George Bancroft, one of the most noted of these, has been judged as a man who “saw the American past as a great play, written by God and man together, moving toward a...

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This section contains 9,363 words
(approx. 32 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Joan Burbick
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