A Vindication of the Rights of Woman | Criticism

Mark Wollstonecraft
This literature criticism consists of approximately 14 pages of analysis & critique of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman.
This section contains 3,875 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James L. Cooper and Sheila McIsaac Cooper

SOURCE: Cooper, James L. and Sheila McIsaac Cooper. “Mary Wollstonecraft: Enlightenment Rebel.” In The Roots of American Feminist Thought, pp. 15-24. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1973.

In the following essay, Cooper and Cooper offer a general introduction to Wollstonecraft's background and her interest in sexual equality before discussing the significance of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman as a foundational text for American feminist thought.

Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) shocked genteel Englishmen and Americans “with the most indecent rhapsody … ever penned by man or woman.” A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792) was nonetheless “so run after” that on occasion there was “no keeping it long enough to read it leisurely.”1 It attracted immediate public notice that ensured its author's fame and notoriety as a champion of women's equality through a “revolution in female education and manners.”2

Shaken by the republican thought and revolutionary action of the emerging middle...

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This section contains 3,875 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James L. Cooper and Sheila McIsaac Cooper
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Gale
Critical Essay by James L. Cooper and Sheila McIsaac Cooper from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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