A Tale of Two Cities | Critical Essay by Lisa Robson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 29 pages of analysis & critique of A Tale of Two Cities.
This section contains 8,643 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Lisa Robson

Critical Essay by Lisa Robson

SOURCE: “The ‘Angels' in Dickens's House: Representation of Women in A Tale of Two Cities,” in Dalhousie Review, Vol. 72, No. 3, Fall, 1992, pp. 311-33.

In the following review, Robson discusses Dickens's depiction of women in A Tale of Two Cities.

I

A Tale of Two Cities is not a woman's text; indeed, there is little chance of its being mistaken for one. In his interpretation of the causes and effects of the French Revolution, Charles Dickens focusses on a patriarchal world of politics and historical development in which men dominate the scene, both privately and publicly. Yet several women characters factor rather importantly in the novel's development, and, as such, merit close scrutiny. The current body of criticism concerning A Tale of Two Cities concentrates mainly on the political and historical elements of the text, while...

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This section contains 8,643 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Lisa Robson