A Tale of Two Cities | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by J. M. Rignall

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of A Tale of Two Cities.
This section contains 5,613 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by J. M. Rignall

Critical Essay by J. M. Rignall

SOURCE: “Dickens and the Catastrophic Continuum of History in A Tale of Two Cities,” in ELH, Vol. 51, No. 3, Fall, 1984, pp. 575-87.

In the following essay, Rignall discusses the relationship between “narrative form and historical vision” in A Tale of Two Cities.

It is not surprising that the most remembered scene in A Tale of Two Cities is the last, for this novel is dominated, even haunted, by its ending. From the opening chapter in which the “creatures of this chronicle” are set in motion “along the roads that lay before them,” while the Woodman Fate and the Farmer Death go silently about their ominous work, those roads lead with sinister inevitability to the revolutionary scaffold.1 To an unusual extent, especially given the expansive...

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This section contains 5,613 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by J. M. Rignall