A Rose for Emily | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 16 pages of analysis & critique of A Rose for Emily.
This section contains 4,292 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John L. Skinner

SOURCE: “‘A Rose for Emily’: Against Interpretation,” in The Journal of Narrative Technique, Vol. 15, No. 1, Winter, 1985, pp. 42–51.

In the following essay, Skinner contends that much critical analysis of “A Rose for Emily” is “ingenious, but misguided.”

“A Rose for Emily,” the story of a woman who has killed her lover and has lain for years beside his decaying corpse, is essentially trivial in its horror because it has no implications, because it is pure event without implication: …1

At a distance of more than fifty years, Lionel Trilling's comments seem almost dismissive, but literary critics have retaliated with an almost obsessive interest. “A Rose for Emily” has become one of Faulkner's most analyzed stories and with some hundred articles devoted to it, there is little encouragement for further interpretation: there may even be good reason for not interpreting the story any more—at least in traditional terms of character...

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This section contains 4,292 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John L. Skinner
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Critical Essay by John L. Skinner from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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