A Midsummer Night's Dream | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 34 pages of analysis & critique of A Midsummer Night's Dream.
This section contains 10,195 words
(approx. 34 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Louis Montrose

SOURCE: "Stories of the Night," in The Purpose of Playing: Shakespeare and the Cultural Politics of the Elizabethan Theatre, The University of Chicago Press, 1996, pp. 124-50.

In the following essay, Montrose examines the mythological subtext of A Midsummer Night's Dream, claiming that Hippolyta's presence at the play's opening invokes Amazonian mythology, which Montrose describes as the "embodiment of a collective, masculine anxiety about women's power to dominate, create, and destroy men. "

The opposed domestic emphases of Brooks and Olson—the former, romantic and companionate; the latter, authoritarian and hierarchical—abstract and oversimplify what may be construed as potentially complementary or contradictory elements in the dramatic process whereby A Midsummer Night's Dream figures the social relationship between the sexes in courtship, marriage, and parenthood. Among the cultural materials employed in the construction of the gender system that is figured in A Midsummer Night's Dream, those of classical...

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This section contains 10,195 words
(approx. 34 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Louis Montrose
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Critical Essay by Louis Montrose from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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