A Midsummer Night's Dream | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 49 pages of analysis & critique of A Midsummer Night's Dream.
This section contains 13,715 words
(approx. 46 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard H. Cox

SOURCE: Cox, Richard H. “Shakespeare: Poetic Understanding and Comic Action (A Weaver's Dream).” In The Artist and Political Vision, edited by Benjamin R. Barber and Michael J. Gargas McGrath, pp. 165-92. New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Books, 1982.

In the following essay, Cox examines the discordant nature of A Midsummer Night's Dream, asserting that in Shakespeare's comic treatment of Theseus, and in the serious undertones of his portrayal of the artisans and especially Bottom, the playwright used comedy to teach his audience serious lessons about civic life.

what hinders one to be merry and tell the truth? as good-natured teachers at first give cakes to their boys, that they may be willing to learn at first the rudiments.

Horace1

imitation is a kind of play, and not serious

Socrates2

I

Political life generally is understood to be a serious matter. And in particular, founders of cities and regimes generally...

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This section contains 13,715 words
(approx. 46 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard H. Cox
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Critical Essay by Richard H. Cox from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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