A Midsummer Night's Dream | Critical Essay by Helen Hackett

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of A Midsummer Night's Dream.
This section contains 6,162 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Helen Hackett

SOURCE: “Varieties of Love, Variations of Genre,” in A Midsummer Night's Dream, Northcote House Publishers Ltd, 1997, pp. 32-46.

In the following essay, Hackett explores the way A Midsummer Night's Dream vascillates between tragic and comic possibilities.

Comedy is above all the drama of love; the conventional marker of a comic happy ending is at least one marriage, founded on the mutual desire of the two partners. In A Midsummer Night's Dream, we get marriage three times over—four if we count the reunion of Oberon and Titania—emphatically confirming that what we have witnessed is a comedy. It is a play where ‘Jack shall have Jill, / Naught shall go ill’ (III. ii. 461-2), forming an outright contrast to another comedy by Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost (1594-5), composed not long before A Midsummer Night's Dream, in which the...

(read more)

This section contains 6,162 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Helen Hackett
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Helen Hackett from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook