A Midsummer Night's Dream | Critical Essay by Bruce Clarke

This literature criticism consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis & critique of A Midsummer Night's Dream.
This section contains 1,742 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Bruce Clarke

Critical Essay by Bruce Clarke

SOURCE: “The Gender of Metamorphosis,” in Allegories of Writing, State University of New York Press, 1995, pp. 113-48.

In the following excerpt, Clarke offers a Freudian analysis of the changeling child and his significance to Oberon and Titania.

Like the pharmakon that slips out of semantic control in the moralization of the Circe story, a similarly ambivalent trope—the “changeling boy”—decenters the daemonic action of A Midsummer Night's Dream. On the one hand, Shakespeare adorns his erotic comedy with a lyrical gamut of names of generated forms, signs of natural growth and abundance. This profuse texture is one reason why, on the surface, the play is so good-natured:

Oberon. I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine...

(read more)

This section contains 1,742 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Bruce Clarke
Follow Us on Facebook