A Christmas Carol | Critical Essay by Harry Stone

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of A Christmas Carol.
This section contains 2,756 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Harry Stone

SOURCE: “Fairy-Tale Form in A Christmas Carol,” in Readings on Charles Dickens, edited by Clarice Swisher, The Greenhaven Press, 1998, pp. 74–81.

In the following excerpt from Stone's 1979 study Dickens and the Invisible World: Fairy Tales, Fantasy, and Novel-Making, Stone asserts that Dickens uses fairy-tale elements in A Christmas Carol.

Dickens wrote five Christmas books: A Christmas Carol (1843), The Chimes (1844), The Cricket on the Hearth (1845), The Battle of Life (1846), and The Haunted Man (1848). … The Christmas books draw their innermost energies from fairy tales: they exploit fairy-tale themes, fairy-tale happenings, and fairy-tale techniques. Indeed the Christmas books are fairy tales. As Dickens himself put it, he was here taking old nursery tales and “giving them a higher form.” …

The design could hardly be simpler or more direct. A protagonist who is mistaken or displays false values is...

(read more)

This section contains 2,756 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Harry Stone
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Harry Stone from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.