A Christmas Carol | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 89 pages of analysis & critique of A Christmas Carol.
This section contains 26,437 words
(approx. 89 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael Patrick Hearn

SOURCE: An introduction to The Annotated Christmas Carol, Clarkson N. Potter, 1976, pp. 1–51.

In the following introductory essay, Hearn places Dickens's novella within a literary, political, and historical context and recounts the circumstances surrounding the publication of the story as well as the critical reaction to it.

A Christmas Carol remains the most popular work of England's most popular novelist, and it has had something of a life of its own beyond its author's reputation. Should all of Charles Dickens' marvelous creations, from Mr. Pickwick to Edwin Drood, be suddenly threatened with extinction, the story of Mr. Scrooge would certainly survive. It has become a part of Christmas folklore. All misers are Ebenezer Scrooge, all plum puddings the same as that devoured by the Cratchits. Besides having written a thoroughly entertaining narrative, Dickens possessed the special ability of defining better than anyone before or since the spirit of...

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This section contains 26,437 words
(approx. 89 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael Patrick Hearn
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Critical Essay by Michael Patrick Hearn from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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