A. C. Benson | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of A. C. Benson.
This section contains 4,717 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Austin Warren

SOURCE: Warren, Austin. “The Happy, Vanished World of A. C. Benson.” Sewanee Review 75 (spring 1967): 268-81.

In the following essay, Warren provides an overview of Benson's works.

Arthur Benson, eldest son of Edward White Benson, successively Canon of Lincoln, Bishop of Truro, and Archbishop of Canterbury, lived in a charmed world of canons, dons, and writers—two of the writers his brothers. His earlier years were spent as Master at Eton; he ended his days as Master of Magdalen College, Cambridge; and his tongue—and, more remarkable, his pen—were never idle. He wrote and published upwards of forty books,—novels, poems, meditative essays, biographies: even, at the Royal Family's request, edited Queen Victoria's Diary. And all this writing was not enough. From 1897 he kept a regular diary, which, by the end of his life, amounted to something like four million words—forty substantial volumes if printed in full...

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This section contains 4,717 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Austin Warren
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Critical Essay by Austin Warren from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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