Nahum Tate Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 26 pages of information about the life of Nahum Tate.
This section contains 7,710 words
(approx. 26 pages at 300 words per page)
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Dictionary of Literary Biography on Nahum Tate

It is one of the minor ironies of literary history that Nahum Tate's small claim to fame is for having the audacity to attempt to "improve" Shakespeare's plays, most egregiously King Lear. His contemporaries found him anything but audacious; Charles Gildon is typical in his referring to "a Person of great Probity of Manners, Learning, and good Nature," whose relative lack of success in the world came from being "guilty of Modesty," since "it is the noisy pushing Man in Poetry, as well as other things, that prevails with Fame as well as Fortune." Modest in manners, Tate possessed abilities to match. The "life" published under the name of Theophilus Cibber in Lives of the Poets (1753) repeated concisely the commonplace view of Tate's limitations: He was "a man of learning, courteous and candid, but was thought to possess no great genius, as being deficient in what is its...

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This section contains 7,710 words
(approx. 26 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Nahum Tate Biography
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Dictionary of Literary Biography
Nahum Tate from Dictionary of Literary Biography. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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