Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 3 pages of information about the life of Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac.
This section contains 775 words
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Encyclopedia of World Biography on Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac

The French chemist and physicist Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (1778-1850) is distinguished for his work on gas laws and for his studies of the properties of cyanogen and iodine.

Born at Saint-Léonard in the department of Vienne, Joseph Gay-Lussac came from a solidly bourgeois family. The storms of the French Revolution delayed his education, but largely by his own disciplined self-teaching, he passed the examinations and was admitted to the prestigious École Polytechnique in 1797. Here he became the protégé of Claude Louis Berthollet.

In these early years Gay-Lussac's skill as an experimenter and scientific instrument maker was well developed. In 1802 he published a law of the expansion of gases by heat, which became known as Charles' law. In 1804 he made an ascent of 23,000 feet in a balloon to collect samples of the atmosphere for chemical analyses and to measure the dependence of the...

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This section contains 775 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac Biography
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Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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