Jane Addams Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 23 pages of information about the life of Jane Addams.
This section contains 6,600 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Jane Addams Biography

Dictionary of Literary Biography on Jane Addams

Jane Addams is best known for her efforts to further humanitarian reform and for founding Hull-House in 1889, a settlement house that grew to a complex of thirteen buildings covering an entire city block on the location that is now the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle. Her work with people of other nationalities, particularly Greeks, Italians, Russians, and Germans, in the Nineteenth Ward in Chicago is chronicled in two autobiographies, Twenty Years at Hull-House, with Autobiographical Notes (1910) and The Second Twenty Years at Hull-House, September 1909 to September 1929, with a Record of Growing World Consciousness (1930). She became an effective advocate at the local, state, and federal levels for issues such as better labor conditions, sanitary standards for food and water, educational reform, recreational facilities for urban youth, and women's suffrage. In 1908 she was named the "First American Woman" by Ladies' Home Journal, which at the time had a circulation...

(read more)

This section contains 6,600 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Jane Addams Biography
Copyrights
Dictionary of Literary Biography
Jane Addams from Dictionary of Literary Biography. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook