Henry Mackenzie Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 29 pages of information about the life of Henry Mackenzie.
This section contains 8,420 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
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Dictionary of Literary Biography on Henry Mackenzie

Henry Mackenzie is, after Laurence Sterne, the chief representative of the sentimental movement in English fiction. He wrote The Man of Feeling (1771) in his early twenties, and its hero, Harley, became, along with Rousseau's Saint-Preux and Goethe's Werther, the type of a sensibility too extreme to live at ease in an unfeeling world. With The Man of the World (1773) and Julia de Roubigné (1777), Mackenzie reached a place of prominence among novelists of the 1770s. Early identified with the hero of his first novel, he was an object of both adulation and criticism. Robert Burns told a correspondent in 1783 that he prized The Man of Feeling "next to the Bible," and the young Samuel Rogers, when asked by Adam Smith whom he most wished to meet in Edinburgh in 1789, replied: "The author of Julia de Roubigné." Samuel Johnson, on the other hand, disliked "the fashionable whine of...

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This section contains 8,420 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Henry Mackenzie Biography
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Henry Mackenzie from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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