George Wald Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 7 pages of information about the life of George Wald.
This section contains 1,812 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
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World of Anatomy and Physiology on George Wald

George Wald received a Nobel Prize for his discovery of the way in which hidden biochemical processes in the retinal pigments of the eye turn light energy into sight. Among Wald's important experiments were the effects of vitamin A on sight and the roles played by rod and cone cells in black and white and color vision. Outside the laboratory, his lectures at Harvard to packed audiences of students generated great intellectual excitement. Wald gained additional fame as a political activist during the turbulent 1960s. Wald's personal belief in the unity of nature and the kinship among all living things was evidenced by the substantial roles he played in the scientific world as well as the political and cultural arena of the 1960s.

Wald's father, Isaac Wald, a tailor and later a foreman in a clothing factory, emigrated from Austrian Poland, while his mother, Ernestine Rosenmann Wald, emigrated...

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This section contains 1,812 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the George Wald Biography
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World of Anatomy and Physiology
George Wald from World of Anatomy and Physiology. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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