Emily (Elizabeth) Dickinson Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 51 pages of information about the life of Emily (Elizabeth) Dickinson.
This section contains 15,215 words
(approx. 51 pages at 300 words per page)
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Dictionary of Literary Biography on Emily (Elizabeth) Dickinson

A poet who took definition as her province, Emily Dickinson challenged the existing definitions of poetry and the poet's work. Like writers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman, she experimented with expression in order to free it from conventional restraints. Like writers such as Charlotte Brontë and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, she crafted a new type of persona for the first person. The speakers in Dickinson's poetry, like those in Brontë's and Browning's works, are sharp-sighted observers who see the inescapable limitations of their societies as well as their imagined and imaginable escapes. To make the abstract tangible, to define meaning without confining it, to inhabit a house that never became a prison, Dickinson created in her writing a distinctively elliptical language for expressing what was possible but not yet realized. Like the Concord Transcendentalists whose works she knew well...

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This section contains 15,215 words
(approx. 51 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Emily (Elizabeth) Dickinson Biography
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Emily (Elizabeth) Dickinson from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.