Elizabeth Robins Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 15 pages of information about the life of Elizabeth Robins.
This section contains 4,373 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
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Dictionary of Literary Biography on Elizabeth Robins

In Elizabeth Robins's own day she was best known as a dramatic interpreter of Henrik Ibsen heroines and as the author of The Magnetic North (1904). A pivotal moment in the decline of her reputation as a writer was the reception of The Mills of the Gods and Other Stories (1920) by female modernists Virginia Woolf and Katherine Mansfield. Both found the stories aesthetically old-fashioned. "The war withered a generation before its time," wrote Woolf in her review of The Mills of the Gods and Other Stories in the Times Literary Supplement (17 June 1920). Woolf, Mansfield, and Rebecca West thought that Robins's artistry, shaped by late-nineteenth-century and Edwardian generic tastes and forms and the tenor of a sexually conservative pre-World War I feminism, needed to be transcended. Since the late 1970s feminist critics and historians have celebrated Robins's theatrical innovations as performer, actress-manager, and playwright, as well as the documentary scope...

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This section contains 4,373 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Elizabeth Robins Biography
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Dictionary of Literary Biography
Elizabeth Robins from Dictionary of Literary Biography. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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