Elizabeth Carter Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 13 pages of information about the life of Elizabeth Carter.
This section contains 3,810 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
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Dictionary of Literary Biography on Elizabeth Carter

Called "our British Minerva" by Samuel Richardson and "daughter to Plato" by Elizabeth Montagu, Elizabeth Carter was for her contemporaries a symbol of the ideal classicist. Her translation of works by the Greek Stoic Philosopher Epictetus (1758), which went through three editions in her lifetime, was long the standard English text. In 1910 J. M. Dent and Sons published Carter's Epictetus in the Everyman's Library series; the firm reprinted the volume thirteen times, the last in 1966. In the eighteenth century Carter's reputation was such that Queen Charlotte requested an interview with the scholar-poet; and within the circles of the London intelligentsia, particularly at the salon gatherings of the Bluestockings, Carter held a place of honor for her vast knowledge of Greek and Latin classics. Her learning transcended traditional gender lines: a contemporary described her as "not only the most learned Woman of any age but one of the most learned...

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This section contains 3,810 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Elizabeth Carter Biography
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Dictionary of Literary Biography
Elizabeth Carter from Dictionary of Literary Biography. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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