Aeschylus Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 33 pages of information about the life of Aeschylus.
This section contains 9,877 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
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In the city of Athens in the fifth century B.C., Aeschylus, the Father of Tragedy, developed a spectacle in which choral song and dance alternated with solo speeches into one of the major genres of world literature. The ninety plays that Aeschylus wrote were performed frequently after his death, and the tragic drama remained a living tradition in the hands of his successors, Sophocles and Euripides. Tragedy also exerted a decisive influence on the development of literary criticism: Aristophanes' comedy Frogs (405 B.C.) is devoted to comparing and contrasting the tragic art of Aeschylus and Euripides, and both the literary form and specific tragedies were analyzed in Aristotle's profoundly influential treatise, Poetics (late fourth century B.C.). Imitations of Greek tragedy written in the first century A.D. by the Roman playwright Seneca later exerted a powerful influence on the development of European theater during the...

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This section contains 9,877 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Aeschylus Biography
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Encyclopedia of World Biography
Aeschylus from Encyclopedia of World Biography. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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