Abraham Cowley Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 13 pages of information about the life of Abraham Cowley.
This section contains 3,888 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
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Dictionary of Literary Biography on Abraham Cowley

"Abraham Cowley was beloved by every muse he courted," states Henry Felton in his Dissertation on Reading the Classics (1713); Cowley excelled in every literary genre he undertook. In his early years, he was best known as a dramatist and satirist; in mid life he was most widely read for the love lyrics of The Mistresse (1647, 1656) and for the Pindaric odes; later readers have alternately preferred Cowley's Anacreontic verse and his essays. It is not for lack of talent that Cowley is accorded secondary status as a poet next to his contemporary John Milton, but because his epics-- The Civil War (1679) and Davideis--were not or could not be completed. Cowley's four books on the troubles of the first biblical kings, however, broke new ground for the epic, preparing the way for Milton's Paradise Lost (1667), and John Dryden considered Cowley the master and reformer of English poetry, according him...

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This section contains 3,888 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Abraham Cowley Biography
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Abraham Cowley from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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