W. P. Kinsella Summary

Everything you need to understand or teach W. P. Kinsella.

  • 1 Student Essay
  • 23 Literature Criticisms
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The W. P. Kinsella Study Pack contains about 94 pages of study material in 24 products, including:

Essays & Analysis (24)

435 words, approx. 2 pages
Critical Essay by George Woodcock [Readers of Canadian literature] have had a plethora of guilt-ridden fiction written by white authors about Indians, and a little fiction written by Indians and Metis... Read more
333 words, approx. 2 pages
Critical Essay by Ian B. Mclatchie In Born Indian, Kinsella creates the composite impression of a carnivorous, overtly hostile white society: "the daughter, who was named Dora, went off to Edmo... Read more
995 words, approx. 4 pages
Critical Essay by Anthony Brennan When I learn that a book is populated by characters called Robert Coyote, Frank Fence-Post, Sadie One-Wound, and Poppy Twelvetrees, my response is usually a groan in ... Read more
206 words, approx. 1 pages
Critical Essay by Terry Andrews Lasansky Dance Me Outside is a vibrant and funny collection of stories…. Written in the first person in a lean style, they concern an eighteen year old Indian na... Read more
220 words, approx. 1 pages
Critical Essay by Choice W. P. Kinsella is a gifted Canadian writer who chooses rather oddly to present his stories through the persona of a Cree Indian, Silas Ermineskin. [In Scars, the] narrator�... Read more
616 words, approx. 3 pages
Critical Essay by Frances W. Kaye W. P. Kinsella is not an Indian, a fact that would not be extraordinary were it not for the stories Kinsella writes about the Cree Silas Ermineskin; and his sister Il... Read more
742 words, approx. 3 pages
Critical Essay by Anthony Bukoski [The ten short stories in Shoeless Joe Jackson Comes to Iowa] mark a considerable change in direction for W. P. Kinsella whose first two collections, Dance Me Outside... Read more
252 words, approx. 1 pages
Critical Essay by Mark Czarnecki [The stories in] Born Indian are cleverly written in a free-wheeling style…. This is Kinsella's third collection of funnysad tales about white-Indian con... Read more
772 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Murray asserts that humor is one of the dominant motifs in Kinsella's body of work. The Canadian author W. P. Kinsella has published two novels and over one hundred sho... Read more
698 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Native-American author Vizenor criticizes Kinsella's portrayals of Canadian Indians, stating that “humor is no excuse to exploit negative preconceptions about tr... Read more
1,715 words, approx. 6 pages
In the following review, Murray evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the short stories in The Fencepost Chronicles. The Fencepost Chronicles is the fifth of Kinsella's Indian books (Dance ... Read more
6,657 words, approx. 23 pages
In the following essay, Aitken examines the various allusions to religion in Kinsella's writing. Ninety feet between bases is the nearest to perfection that man has yet achieved. (Red Smith) T... Read more
212 words, approx. 1 pages
In the following review, Campbell offers a positive assessment of Red Wolf, Red Wolf. While W. P. Kinsella has written 15 books and more than 200 short stories, he is undoubtedly best known for his pr... Read more
543 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, the critic praises Kinsella's storytelling abilities and provides several plot synopses of the stories in Red Wolf, Red Wolf. If you've never had the pleasure of... Read more
4,436 words, approx. 15 pages
In the following essay, Hamblin examines the elements of “magic realism” present in Kinsella's works. As Robert Francis's well-known poem, “Pitcher,” persuade... Read more
480 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following excerpt, Friis-Baastad praises the tales in Born Indian, noting that “these stories will move you as only the best products of the art of storytelling can.” In his previ... Read more
552 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following excerpt, Panofsky evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of The Winter Helen Dropped By. Although each addresses such contemporary issues as the often diminished lives of Native Canad... Read more
348 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, the critic faults Magic Time for being overly sentimental, contrived, and a rehashing of similar themes and plots from Kinsella's previous novels. Canadian native Kinse... Read more
320 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, the critic delivers a brief plot summary and contends that while not as strong as Kinsella's previous works, Magic Time still provides a satisfying ending, genuine char... Read more
492 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following excerpt, Choice compliments Kinsella's prose in The Thrill of the Grass, noting that the collection is both surprising and engrossing. W. P. Kinsella's Shoeless Joe perf... Read more
738 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Kahn examines the plot structure and prose of The Iowa Baseball Confederacy. The centerpiece in W. P. Kinsella's intriguing and sometimes perplexing new novel [The Iowa... Read more
1,009 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Wallach discusses the similarities and differences between The Iowa Baseball Confederacy and Morry Frank's Every Young Man's Dream. Name me a more perfect game! ... Read more
4,815 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following essay, Randall draws comparisons between the ways that Kinsella and authors Thomas Carlyle and J. R. R. Tolkien approach humor in their works. In his essay on Jean Paul Friedrich Rich... Read more
491 words, approx. 2 pages
William Patrick Kinsella, also known as W.P Kinsella was born in Edmonton Canada, on May 25th, 1935. While his father, John Kinsella, attended his everyday job as a contractor, his mother, Olive Kinse... Read more