New South Summary

Everything you need to understand or teach New South.

  • 16 Literature Criticisms
Follow Us on Facebook

Study Pack

The New South Study Pack contains:

Essays & Analysis (16)

2,665 words, approx. 9 pages
In the following essay, Sewell assesses the work of several Southern fiction writers of the late nineteenth century. With the period of recuperation and readjustment which came soon after the Civil Wa... Read more
5,168 words, approx. 18 pages
In the following essay, Shillingsburg studies representative works by Caroline Hentz, Grace King, and Kate Chopin as they reflect women's changing views in the late nineteenth-century American ... Read more
10,931 words, approx. 37 pages
In the following essay, Stephens probes the literary precursors of George Washington Cable's novel The Grandissimes and discusses the work as the first fully-realized family saga in Southern li... Read more
10,315 words, approx. 35 pages
In the following excerpt, Gray addresses historical and biographical elements at work in the early fiction of Ellen Glasgow. Ellen Glasgow was reluctant to think of herself as a Southern writer. She w... Read more
6,783 words, approx. 23 pages
In the following introduction to her book-length study, MacKethan details the post-Reconstruction literary vision of the Old South as a pastoral paradise. In 1863 a fifteen-year-old printer's a... Read more
4,400 words, approx. 15 pages
In the following essay, MacKethan explores the rhetorical and structural techniques used by writers of the New South in their representation of old plantation myths. The literary phenomenon of the Old... Read more
7,332 words, approx. 25 pages
In the following essay, Glazer and Key analyze popular depictions of the Old South plantation pastoral in the late nineteenth century. In simple truth and beyond question there was in our Virginia cou... Read more
9,769 words, approx. 33 pages
In the following essay, Gebhard enumerates culturally subversive qualities in otherwise sentimental representations of white Southern gentlemen in the literature of the New South. [Colonel Grangerford... Read more
5,473 words, approx. 19 pages
In the following essay, Rubin surveys Southern literature of the post-Reconstruction period, concentrating on the local color movement, literary depictions of blacks, and the state of poetry. In 1873,... Read more
9,897 words, approx. 33 pages
In the following essay, Ridgely presents an overview of Southern literature between 1879 and 1899, emphasizing major figures and works in the era of local color. The South's strong resistance d... Read more
4,370 words, approx. 15 pages
In the following essay, Richardson describes the work of the major local color writers of the New South. When the journalist Edward King visited New Orleans in early 1873 as representative of “... Read more
14,760 words, approx. 50 pages
In the following excerpt, Gray concentrates on developments in the literature of the New South from the romance and nostalgia of early writers, to the cultural expressions of Sidney Lanier's po... Read more
4,881 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following excerpt, Howell summarizes modern historical assessments of the New South, focusing on such themes as Southern distinctiveness, identity, industrialization, economics, populism, and r... Read more
5,447 words, approx. 19 pages
In the following essay, Simpson comments on the contemporary, politicized interpretation of Mark Twain as the novelist of a regenerate America. “What are the Great United States for, sir,ȁ... Read more
6,758 words, approx. 23 pages
In the following essay, Rubin examines George Washington Cable's novel John March, Southerner as it illustrates the limitations of the genteel, local color tradition that dominated Southern fic... Read more
5,678 words, approx. 19 pages
In the following essay, Kreyling appraises the literary tastes of the New South in relation to three novelists: Lafcadio Hearn, Grace King, and George Washington Cable. The southern writer in the clos... Read more