Janet Malcolm Summary

Everything you need to understand or teach Janet Malcolm.

  • 37 Literature Criticisms
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Study Pack

The Janet Malcolm Study Pack contains:

Essays & Analysis (37)

1,133 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Thompson disagrees with Malcolm's theories about photography in Diana & Nikon. Thompson feels a photographer's work should be considered artistic when vie... Read more
2,343 words, approx. 8 pages
In the following review, Stimpson discusses The Journalist and the Murderer, and Malcolm's opinion that moralistic shortcomings are inherent in journalistic endeavors. The Journalist and the Mu... Read more
706 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review of The Journalist and the Murderer, Christmas focuses on the lengths journalists will go to get a story and comments on their perception of moral obligations. This [The Journal... Read more
1,387 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following review of The Journalist and the Murderer, Symons disagrees with Malcolm's assertion that journalists must use any means available to report a story. The background should be b... Read more
1,841 words, approx. 7 pages
In the following review, Barber faults The Journalist and the Murderer, alleging the book fails to carry the weight of its opening lines and that Malcolm's intent in writing the book is aimed a... Read more
4,720 words, approx. 16 pages
In the following essay, Hoyt examines the Masson v. Malcolm libel case, and Malcolm's book The Journalist and the Murderer. Hoyt provides background information on both Malcolm and Jeffrey Mass... Read more
3,409 words, approx. 12 pages
In the following essay, Himmelfarb examines the Masson v. Malcolm lawsuit and its legal ramifications, referring to In the Freud Archives and written summaries about the case. Himmelfarb asserts that ... Read more
3,827 words, approx. 13 pages
In the following review, Erens appraises the essays in The Purloined Clinic, noting that Malcolm urges readers to uncover truths by exposing falsehoods. Janet Malcolm has a rare talent: She is able to... Read more
1,760 words, approx. 6 pages
In the following review, Pettingell praises The Silent Woman, contending Malcolm provides an adept treatment of Sylvia Plath's death, her relationship with husband Ted Hughes, and the biographi... Read more
3,247 words, approx. 11 pages
In the following review, Showalter describes The Silent Woman as nonfiction, yet notices that the story contains elements of mystery, romance, and melodrama pertaining not only to Sylvia Plath and Ted... Read more
4,706 words, approx. 16 pages
In the following review of The Silent Woman, Bromwich compliments Malcolm's determination and journalistic prowess, but questions Malcolm's judgment to make herself an active character w... Read more
909 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following excerpt, James uses sarcasm to refute many of the proposed theories about photography in Diana & Nikon. The very first book illustrated with photographs, William Fox Talbot�... Read more
1,337 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following review, Crick wholeheartedly endorses The Silent Woman as an insightful study of the genre of biography and the influences and preconceptions that appear in any biographer's wr... Read more
980 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Chisholm judges The Silent Woman as engaging but finds that the book sheds little new light on the Sylvia Plath-Ted Hughes relationship or on the art of biography itself. In 1... Read more
560 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Viney contends that The Silent Woman is intelligently written but maintains that Malcolm is one-sided in her adoration of Ted Hughes and less than sympathetic to other biograp... Read more
2,938 words, approx. 10 pages
In the following review, Dinnage agrees with Malcolm that myths surrounding Sylvia Plath's life and career have overshadowed actual history. Dinnage judges The Silent Woman as offering a truly ... Read more
2,141 words, approx. 8 pages
In the following review, Kagan focuses on Malcolm's protective stance of Ted Hughes in The Silent Woman, and expresses disapproval of Malcolm's negative portrayal of journalists, biograp... Read more
729 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Mitchison feels that at times the essays in The Purloined Clinic are verbose and stray off track, but when Malcolm is focused, her writing is honest, direct, and stimulating. ... Read more
1,898 words, approx. 7 pages
In the following essay, Lakoff and Aftel describe the techniques Malcolm employs in her writing to persuade readers, disapproving of her subtle guidance, and asserting that nonfiction should be writte... Read more
621 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Coles alleges that in Diana & Nikon Malcolm attempts to emphasize the vagueness of photography, both in terms of artistic intent and interpretation. The adage has it th... Read more
802 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Chisholm underscores the predatory aspects of journalism and notes that, in The Journalist and the Murderer, Malcolm raises interesting questions about the ethics of journalis... Read more
1,751 words, approx. 6 pages
In the following review of The Crime of Sheila McGough, Citron expresses amazement at the glaring mistakes committed by McGough in her relationship with client Bob Bailes. Citron is taken aback by McG... Read more
2,091 words, approx. 7 pages
In the following review of Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, Storr evaluates Malcolm's views on traditional, dispassionate psychoanalysis, contrasting such methods to sympathetic and i... Read more
1,361 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following review, Lamb asserts that Malcolm fails to make McGough's innocence convincing in The Crime of Sheila McGough. As a writer, Janet Malcolm is chiefly interested in betrayal, and... Read more
3,630 words, approx. 13 pages
In the following review, Oates asserts that The Crime of Sheila McGough is not one of Malcolm's stronger works. Oates feels journalistic strengths are evident in the book, but with McGough as s... Read more
4,798 words, approx. 16 pages
In the following review, Posner, a U.S. Chief Justice, outlines what he perceives as flaws in The Crime of Sheila McGough. Posner disapproves of Malcolm's lenient attitude toward McGough'... Read more
9,373 words, approx. 32 pages
In the following essay, Landsman attempts to analyze Malcolm's intent in writing The Crimes of Sheila McGough. Landsman believes Malcolm's views reflect her growing repugnance for the le... Read more
2,565 words, approx. 9 pages
In the following excerpt, Bayley states that in Reading Chekhov, Malcolm masterfully blends personal insight with literary evaluation and social commentary about the life and works of Anton Chekhov. I... Read more
1,557 words, approx. 6 pages
In the following review, Bermel contends that, although Malcolm's black-and-white opinions on various Chekhov plays and characters are detrimental to understanding his message, Reading Chekhov ... Read more
751 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Smee examines Reading Chekhov and discusses Malcolm's analytic look at realism within Chekhov's works. Although Janet Malcolm has written in depth about an extra... Read more
3,059 words, approx. 11 pages
In the following essay, specially commissioned for Contemporary Literary Criticism, Eder discusses Malcolm's work and career. Janet Malcolm was born in Prague in 1925, one of two daughters of a... Read more
467 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Shearer lauds Malcolm's probing of psychoanalysis in Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, contending that her examination of techniques used by analysts is enligh... Read more
1,633 words, approx. 6 pages
In the following excerpt, Brophy occasionally questions Malcolm's beliefs and interpretations of psychoanalysis, but on the whole, states that Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession is thoug... Read more
504 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review of In the Freud Archives, Mindess, a psychotherapist, asserts that Jeffrey Masson's refutation of Freud's infantile sexuality theory is subversive, incorrect, and... Read more
681 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Seabrook characterizes In the Freud Archives as a captivating examination of psychoanalysis and an insightful look at the tenets and practices of analysts who follow Freud�... Read more
3,610 words, approx. 13 pages
In the following review, Wilmers studies Malcolm's Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession and In the Freud Archives, underscoring the exclusiveness and the separatist aspects of the psychoan... Read more
1,268 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following review of The Journalist and the Murderer, Rieff investigates Malcolm's theories regarding the role of journalists and the ideas of exploitation, integrity, and artistic merit.... Read more