Jane Hamilton Summary

Everything you need to understand or teach Jane Hamilton.

  • 21 Literature Criticisms
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Study Pack

The Jane Hamilton Study Pack contains about 128 pages of study material in 21 products, including:

Essays & Analysis (21)

1,394 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following review, Berne outlines the plot of The Book of Ruth, highlighting its central themes in contrast with those of Elizabeth Benedict's The Beginner's Book of Dreams. You wo... Read more
366 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Paterson examines the elements of classical tragedy in The Book of Ruth. In a return to be welcomed, love and God seem to be making their way back into fiction. Jane Hamilton&... Read more
992 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Parini focuses on Hamilton's characterization in The Frogs are Still Singing, the title under which The Book of Ruth was published in Great Britain. He compares the nov... Read more
647 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, MacLachlan assesses the themes and plot of A Map of the World. Jane Hamilton, author of The Book of Ruth, for which she received the PEN/Hemingway Foundation Award for best fi... Read more
1,222 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following review, Eder describes the principal characters of A Map of the World in the context of the novel's narrative structure and themes. In a patch of Wisconsin woods, late on a sum... Read more
768 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Coulter summarizes the central themes of A Map of the World, noting that Hamilton's examination of the power of forgiveness is “remarkable.” What does it ... Read more
741 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Korelitz praises A Map of the World for its skillful evocation of rural Midwestern life. Jane Hamilton's tense novel [A Map of the World] opens with the accidental drow... Read more
717 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Pierce highlights the realistic portrayal of daily life on Midwestern farms for women in A Map of the World, drawing thematic and character comparisons to classical tragedy. B... Read more
2,129 words, approx. 8 pages
In the following interview, Hamilton discusses the inspiration for the characters and themes of her novels through The Short History of a Prince. A young man coming of age in suburban Illinois in the ... Read more
1,326 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following review, Eder offers a positive assessment of The Short History of a Prince, praising the novel's “sympathy and nerve.” If you are William and the world won'... Read more
5,039 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following interview, Hamilton discusses her family and career during two meetings with Strasser—one at a public reading, the other at Hamilton's home—detailing the effects ... Read more
1,707 words, approx. 6 pages
In the following review, Brown focuses on the dual passions of Walter, the protagonist in The Short History of a Prince, noting his key differences from Hamilton's previous protagonists. Althou... Read more
339 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Gordon examines the disparity between the protagonist's extraordinary dreams and his ordinary life in The Short History of a Prince. This story [The Short History of a ... Read more
10,481 words, approx. 35 pages
In the following essay, Levin traces the influence of 1980s myths about family life on the heroines of A Map of the World, Jane Smiley's A Thousand Acres, and Bharati Mukherjee's Jasmine... Read more
335 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Reynolds assesses the characters of Disobedience in light of typical family relations in modern society. Henry [in Disobedience] is 17, a bit of a hacker but not completely so... Read more
889 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Charles analyzes the principal characters of Disobedience in terms of the relationship between technology and human nature. Jane Hamilton has written a novel so disturbing tha... Read more
3,563 words, approx. 12 pages
In the following interview, Hamilton discusses her writing process and teaching career, her inspiration for and significance of various elements in Disobedience, and the roles of setting and humor in ... Read more
496 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, McGrann explores the significance of the disconnect between past and present in the characters of Disobedience, observing that the novel's tension hinges on the relatio... Read more
486 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Gerrard focuses on the emotional consequences of knowledge and truth on the narrator of Disobedience, particularly as they affect his relationship with his mother. Jane Hamilt... Read more
491 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Hutchings emphasizes the interplay between the narrator's teenaged and adult perspectives in Disobedience. Henry Shaw, the 17-year-old narrator of Jane Hamilton'... Read more
3,990 words, approx. 14 pages
In the following review, Pritchard examines a selection of recent novels, including Disobedience, arguing that Hamilton's realistic portrayal of a mother-son relationship is “a solid and... Read more